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tax planning (3)

Your largest expense

Peak Disclosure - Click Here Please

One of my esteemed thought leaders that I know posted this early this morning. 

"understand that taxes will be the largest expense during your lifetime
understand the tax code and rules
and get a good tax planner, not a tax preparer (Know the difference)
tax planning is part of financial planning"

It's so true, it's one of the reasons we run a family office, it gives us the full picture of a clients financial life, plus important insights in other aspects of their life as well. We are able to make sure all the pieces of the puzzles fit and a big part of this is to maximize the tax efficency's that my be possible, everyone's sitution is different. 

For many, taxes are number one, even those with modest incomes will find that they are paying a lot out in various taxes, even if there personal federal and provincial taxes is nil or minimal.

 

Taxes are part of our Mission, Vision and Core Values , incase anyone ever wonder ,  we get it 

 

Will expand on this topic in the future. 

Tim

Mission - Vision – Core Values

“Serving our clients and community since 1988”

OMEGA STEWARDSHIP

* One Stop Process Driven Approach for Retirement & Income Planning

* Personalized Tax Management Solutions for Individuals & Business Owners

* Confidential Wealth Management Solutions

www.BrockShoresFinancial.ca www.TimothyRoss.com #ImprovingFutures www.ImprovingFutures.ca


Helping Families Achieve ... Life's Major Goals

1. Tax Smart Planning & Investing

2. Worry Free Retirement

3. Education of Our Children & Grandchildren

4. Quality Care for Our Parents

5. Meaningful Financial Help for Our Loved Ones

6. Meaningful Legacy

 

 

 

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Home Office Refunds

Home Office  can mean potentially some nice tax deductions, check in with me and we can discuss your situation and perhaps save you a few grand every year and protect it from CRA should they question yet, plus a Hst Rebate that many miss

 

Great article on Home Office Decorating and Setup sourced from Dave Wilson a great local realtor / broker in the Brock Shores area. I seen this article on his Linked In feeds and it inspired me to work on this blog. It reminded me of the importance of having this deduction if possible and what qualifies. 

https://freshome.com/rooms/office/

 

Now the basics ......

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TD1 Looking Ahead to 2018

Looking ahead to 2018 (December 2017)

"Some tips from support at Cantax, be proactive this year and get your forms done up in advance and if your doing some extra tax stuff, use the T1213, Request to Reduce Tax Deductions at Source", links are noted below ~ TLR 

Planning for – or even thinking about – 2018 taxes when it’s not even mid-December 2017 may seem more than a little premature. However, most Canadians will start paying their taxes for 2018 with the first paycheque they receive in January, and it’s worth taking a bit of time to make sure that things start off – and stay – on the right foot.

For most Canadians, (certainly for the vast majority who earn their income from employment), income tax, along with other statutory deductions like Canada Pension Plan contributions and Employment Insurance premiums, are paid periodically throughout the year by means of deductions taken from each paycheque received, with those deductions then remitted to the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) on the taxpayer’s behalf by his or her employer.

Quick Download for Federal Form TD1 & respective Provincial Forms

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/forms-publications/td1-personal-tax-credits-returns/td1-forms-pay-received-on-january-1-later.html

Of course, each taxpayer’s situation is unique and so the employer has to have some guidance as to how much to deduct and remit on behalf of each employee. That guidance is provided by the employee/taxpayer in the form of TD1 forms which are completed and signed by each employee, sometimes at the start of each year, but certainly at the time employment commences. Each employee must, in fact, complete two TD1 forms – one for federal tax purposes and the other for provincial tax imposed by the province in which the taxpayer lives. Federal and provincial TD1 forms for 2018 (which were recently posted on the CRA website at https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/forms-publications/forms.html) list the most common statutory credits claimed by taxpayers, including the basic personal credit, the spousal credit amount, and the age amount. Adding amounts claimed on each form gives the Total Claim Amounts (one federal, one provincial) which the employer then uses to determine, based on tables issued by the CRA, the amount of income tax which should be deducted (or withheld) from each of the employee’s paycheques and remitted on his or her behalf to the federal government.

While the TD1 completed by the employee at the time his or her employment commenced will have accurately reflected the credits claimable by the employee at that time, everyone’s life circumstances change. Where a baby is born, or a son or daughter starts post-secondary education, a taxpayer turns 65 years of age, or an elderly parent comes to live with his or her children, the affected taxpayer will be become eligible to claim tax credits not previously available. And, since the employer can only calculate source deductions based on information provided to it by the employee, those new credit claims won’t be reflected in the amounts deducted at source from the employee’s paycheque.

Consequently, it’s a good idea for all employees to review the TD1 form prior to the start of each taxation year and to make any changes needed to ensure that a claim is made for any and all credit amounts currently available to him or her. Doing so will ensure that the correct amount of tax is deducted at source throughout the year.

Where the taxpayer has available deductions which cannot be recorded on the TD1, like RRSP contributions, deductible support payments or child care expenses, it makes things a little more complicated, but it’s still possible to have source deductions adjusted to accurately reflect the employee’s tax liability for 2018. The way to do so is to file Form T1213, Request to Reduce Tax Deductions at Source (available on the CRA website at https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/forms-publications/forms/t1213.html) with the CRA. Once that form is filed with the CRA, the Agency will, after verifying that the claims made are accurate, provide the employer with a Letter of Authority authorizing that employer to reduce the amount of tax being withheld at source.

Of course, as with all things bureaucratic, having one’s source deductions reduced by filing a T1213 takes time. Consequently, the sooner a T1213 for 2018 is filed with the CRA, the sooner source deductions can be adjusted, effective for all paycheques subsequently issued in that year. Providing an employer with an updated TD1 for 2018 at the same time will ensure that source deductions made during 2018 will accurately reflect all of the employee’s current circumstances, and consequently his or her actual tax liability for the year.


The information presented is only of a general nature, may omit many details and special rules, is current only as of its published date, and accordingly cannot be regarded as legal or tax advice. Please contact our office for more information on this subject and how it pertains to your specific tax or financial situation.
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