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budget (5)

Dragon & Shark Tips on Saving

https://www.msn.com/en-ca/money/personalfinance/mark-cuban-the-3-best-tips-to-save-more-money-in-2018/ar-BBHolyp?li=AA54rW&ocid=spartandhp

1. Ditch the plastic

2. Watch your spending

"Be a smart shopper," Cuban tells CNBC Make It.

"You will quickly find that the greatest rate of return you will earn is on your own personal spending," he writes on his blog.

3. Put your money to work

All that money you didn't spend? "Once you have at least six months salary saved, put what you have saved to work, get it invested

Check out Kevin's video on coffee! 

Now when I was at Quick Books Connect in Dec in Toronto, Bruce was one of our guest speakers, I was one of the last to get a picture with him and I was not on the list, now Bruce was a gentleman and waved me over, as the QB Team clicked for us, he said, I seen you in the front row while I was presenting and he thought to himself, there must be a story behind that beard, they don't grow overnight, I assured him there was and perhaps I would be able to share it with him someday. ~ TLR 

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Start Fresh

https://www.youneedabudget.com/why-starting-fresh-isnt-giving-up/ Great article on budgeting, even greater concept, to start fresh vs starting over. Enjoy the article, I am looking at this budgeting tool and others. Any feedback from others is appreciated. TLR https://www.youneedabudget.com/why-starting-fresh-isnt-giving-up/ Quick word association quiz: What’s the difference between “starting over” and “starting fresh”? One of them feels pretty heavy, doesn’t it? A little bit like failure: “You mean, I have to start over?!” I’ve had this thought part way into countless projects renovating our “antique” home. It’s come up in one or two conversations with my kids about homework. But a fresh start? Almost liberating, right? “Today, I have a chance to start fresh.” Deep breath. Ever start a new job? Go off to college? Wake up to a new day after an argument the night before? Start writing this blog post for the second or third—OK. fine—fourth time? Each one a fresh start. In the last seven years, I’ve had five different budgets. The first time I started a new one, it felt like starting over. But I’ve since approached it differently—a fresh start—an opportunity to learn and improve every time. Read on the link for the rest of the story
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Sleepless Govenor

https://www.wealthprofessional.ca/market-talk/these-are-the-biggest-fears-for-the-canadian-economy-235530.aspx Things that keep the govenor awake at night One thing he said was that young people just starting need jobs and without those jobs they can get stuck right from the Get go. I had an idea, stewardship thought moment. The government should make a job for every young person for their first job, give them the experience of having a job, limit it to at least a year, and have a lot of young people with a good first job, launch them into the world with a good foundation, bring the age down for the permanent positions to make room for our young people and redeploy these people into industry and other services. Stabilize, Train, Encourage, Launch A little utopia idea , I think it could have merit and would increase the value for society as a whole - TLR
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What If It Is All Taken Away

Good question, good answers

A message we all should consider, quite frankly, by the grace of God goes I. Now there has been times that we have had to help people walk through these waters. This can be a very scary, frightening time, and yet, a liberating time in ones life when it is all taken away. When we use that word "All" we are often speaking about the money, the assets, and we miss the point that all is not everything, there is something's that can not betaken away from you. Will make a list of those none all things some day, and I encourage readers to add to the list, I look forward to reading what those treasures that can not be taken away from you would be.  ~ TLR

https://www.desiringgod.org/articles/what-if-god-takes-it-all-away

What If God Takes It All Away?

Trusting Him Through Financial Struggles

Guest Contributor

Recently we drove past our old house for the first time since downsizing. Immediately, our four children began rehearsing memories, noting every part of the house that they missed. Once again, they struggled to understand why we had to give it all up.

As hard as I tried to respond with confidence that it was the right thing for our family to follow God’s leading — even at the cost of financial comfort and a home we loved — deep down, I wrestled with my own nostalgia and questions.

Living on Far Less

Rewind six years when we were living well below our means, carefully planning for the future, and seeking wise counsel to be good stewards of our rising income. But, in his strange sovereignty, God chose to teach us how little control we really had.

Even as our oldest child’s neurological challenges seemed to consume us, other pressures were mounting. My health continued to decline and my husband’s on-call job often left me feeling like a single parent. Medical bills increased, and our confidence in the future was replaced by a growing reality that our family was in crisis.

God led us to a place where there was no other option but to let go of all we had saved, planned, and worked hard for. Within a few short months, my husband took a new job that brought significantly less income (but allowed him to be home more often). We sold our dream home, moved in with my parents, and were completely unsure of what the future held.

Am I Trusting in Prosperity?

Where did we go wrong? Maybe somewhere, but maybe nowhere.

Although God commands us to live wisely with what he entrusts us with, he ultimately asks us to trust him above all else, no matter the cost.

Through all of this, even in our desire to use our resources for God’s glory, he has taught me to search my heart by continually asking three questions.

1. Do I live in fear of losing my comfort?

If we desire worldly comforts, and fear earthly loss more than we fear God, then we will likely make decisions and plans according to what we think will keep our lives most comfortable. Looking back, I can now see the Lord’s severe mercy in overturning the plans we had set for our lives. He removed all of our earthly means to find comfort and security in this world. It was painful, yes, but it was also freeing.

As our eyes become increasingly fixed on fearing the Lord and trusting his promises for us, we can live in greater freedom to plan and live wisely according to God’s plan, rather than living in bondage to our own.

2. What legacy am I leaving?

Where we pour our time, energy, and money is a part of building the legacy that we will leave when we are gone. Are we working so many hours for our family’s comfort but are never there to invest in them spiritually and relationally? Are we so focused on planning for the future that we miss how God is calling us to live radically in the present? Or, does our lifestyle suggest that this earth actually is our home?

I am not saying we should not enjoy the gifts that God has given us, but we are commanded to be good stewards of what God has entrusted to us. We should be frequently asking the Holy Spirit to examine our hearts and show us where earthy treasures are motivating us more than eternal ones, that we might pursue righteousness above all else (Matthew 6:33).

3. Whether in prosperity or need, is Jesus enough?

We should plan and save — but is Christ enough if he chooses to take it all away?

In a two-year period, we went from debating how to redesign and remodel our kitchen to wrestling with how we would feed our family of six on food stamps. Both seasons have presented different challenges. In comfort, it was a constant temptation to put our confidence and joy in the false security that wealth gave us. While we desired to honor Christ with all that we had, if I’m honest, it was far too easy to be distracted by the excess.

Far Greater Treasure

Admittedly, the past two years have tested us in other ways as well. We’ve wrestled with trusting the Lord’s leading when it seemed only to lead to greater need and suffering. We were tempted to envy the seemingly comfortable lives of those around us. We’ve questioned why God would allow us to lose everything when we earnestly sought to honor him in our steps. We have struggled to understand why God has taken away provisions for the necessary treatments and doctors that our family’s chronic health issues require. And, at times, we have struggled to see God’s provisions and undeserving gifts because we were so focused on what we had lost.

Yet by his grace, he has continually shown himself faithful, providing in his way and timing, while changing our hearts along the way.

In whatever season you find yourself, hold firmly to the truth that Christ is and will always be enough (Philippians 4:19). He is a greater treasure than anything else this world can give. Sometimes, it may take losing everything on this earth to truly come to believe that with every ounce of our being.

Plan for the Future — But Don’t Hope in It

Now there is great gain in godliness with contentment, for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world. But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content. (1 Timothy 6:6-8)

We are commanded to be content today because none of us have a guarantee of what tomorrow holds. Therefore, as Christ-honoring as it is to steward our resources wisely — to plan and save for an emergency fund, home, and retirement — we must always be on guard that we are not placing our hope in them. As we grow in understanding how temporary this life really is, we will learn to hold more loosely to our plans, live in freedom rather than fear, and be willing to spend ourselves more radically for the Lord.

When we find ourselves with a comfortable bank account and all of our efforts panning out as we hoped, we must be careful that our security and joy is not found there. We must boldly ask the Lord to both keep us dependent and to help us, in any situation, to glorify him. May we be slow to judge those who are struggling (not assuming it’s their own laziness or poor judgment), and quick to see how God’s grace has provided for us abundantly for his purposes.

You Can Lean on Him

If, on the other hand, you are reeling from the loss of what you worked hard for, or are carrying the burden of an uncertain future, take heart and rest in the one who sees your needs and is faithful to provide.

May this be a season that you see and savor an increased desire and love for Christ as you lean on him for your current and future needs. Be careful of giving way to resentment or envy towards those who appear to be more comfortable. Your intense season of need may be the greatest gift of grace that God has given you for his eternal purposes.

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