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Negative Overload - It Can Happen

A cloudy day is no match for a sunny disposition. William Arthur Ward

I seen a post on one of my friends feeds just now.  It reminds me of how I feel sometimes, there is a number of changes happening in our current economic and political landscape and doesn't seem to matter what you post , there is most often negative response.

 

This quote from Rana C pretty well sums it up

" We live in especially pessimistic times. We’re pessimistic about the environment, pessimistic about America, pessimistic about the government and education.

The resulting stew of negativity makes me worry that the future

Fortunately, research suggests things we can do help

Pay more attention to the positive, and help others do the same....
There’s one problem with the pessimist’s perspective: it’s wrong.

That negative dystopian soup is an illusion, the result of an unfortunate collision between a 24/7 news cycle and the brain’s tendency to hone in on any possible danger and ignore everything else. Overall, things on planet Earth are pretty good — or at least, in many ways, they’ve never been better. No country in the world has a lower life expectancy now than the countries with the highest life expectancies in 1800. More people around the world believe in gender equality than ever before, and more value religious freedom. Poverty, malnutrition, illiteracy, child labor and infant mortality are all on the decline.

Stay out of the negatives "

Another friend of his reminds us of my mentor Nick's quote

"Optimism is the only realism. It's the only worldview which squares with the facts, and with the historical record." — Nick Murray, Simple Wealth

 

And to start it all off thismorning my word for the day was rather depressing, yet it is there.

Weltschmerz

Definition

1 often capitalized Weltschmerz : mental depression or apathy caused by comparison of the actual state of the world with an ideal state

2 often capitalized Weltschmerz : a mood of sentimental sadness

Did You Know?

The word weltschmerz initially came into being as a by-product of the European Romanticism movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. A combining of the German words for "world" (Welt) and "pain" (Schmerz), weltschmerz aptly captures the melancholy and pessimism that often characterized the artistic expressions of the era. The term was used in German by the Romantic author Jean Paul (pseudonym of Johann Paul Friedrich Richter) in his 1827 novel Selina, but it wasn't adopted into English until the middle of the 19th century.

 

I had never heard of this word before, I wonder what tomorrow's word brings us.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/word-of-the-day

 

Let the light in

 

Have a blessed day!

Timothy Ross

 

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